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Archive for February, 2012|Monthly archive page

Captain America Could Soon Be Real

In Politics on February 18, 2012 at 10:50 pm

I read an article recently (which i’ll put below) about the military’s future ability to create super soldiers. Soon we’ll develop the technology to train soldiers to run huge distances without getting tired, eat whatever they can find and digest it easily, get shot or stabbed and be healed within minutes.

This obviously leads to many moral questions and to the biggest question…Why? Humans don’t have natural resources to survive like a wolf has claws or a bird has flight, the only thing we have is our brain and the ability to use our brain to survive. We’re weak and vulnerable everywhere on our bodies, but what if we could tune our bodies to be on par with almost every animal in the wild? What if we could run as fast as a cheetah, or have the pure strength of a bear? The only thing that is holding us back is ourselves.

See the problem with war is not war itself, war has and always will exist among every member of the animal kingdom and we can create impressive technology to fight these wars but people still die. So how do not only make it easier to kill the enemy but harder for the enemy to kill us? We’ve done so so far by training toops to be stronger, run farther and jump higher but what if they can naturally do all of that? Soldiers that need very little physical training and all mental training would lead to, in essence, super soliders.

One path could start at the heart. With a more powerful heart, we could run farther, lift huge weights and even be smarter. The brain operates on a very important components, oxygen, almost like battery the brain makes connections because of the amount of oxygen it gets (this isn’t the only reason). If our heart was pumping 3x more oxygenated blood to our brains, they could operate at much higher capacity and make soldiers, or even us, smarter. So soldiers could not only be strong, but smarter in the field.

A big question is the moral implications of such an undertaking. We obviously cannot create these pills or inject a solution by magic, we’ll have to do extensive testing that will eventually be done on humans. Certain standards such as the Nuremberg code and The Deceleration of Helsinki say that such testing would be illegal, but as the article states testing that falls under “military necessity” allows them to do such things will willful consent. But let’s say that we create this pill and create 7 foot tall, 300 lb, fighting monsters that do their job and do it well, how do we trust them with that power? What if they go berserk (for lack of a better term)?

So the future holds plenty of questions and when the time comes around that this testing becomes legitimate, we’ll have to way the good and the bad and boy do I feel bad for the Congress that has to create laws on this.

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/02/more-than-human-the-ethics-of-biologically-enhancing-soldiers/253217/

The United States – An Introvert

In Politics on February 17, 2012 at 12:29 pm

With Iran and Israel on the brink of war, it seems that conflict is becoming an equally preferred choice to diplomacy. Since 2001 I’ve maintained that the U.S. is at a point in time where we must revert back to a state of isolationism. The United States is increasingly being pulled into conflicts due to the fact that we have the power to do so and we viewed as a “big brother” to the world. The enevitable conflict with Iran and Israel will turn the world’s eyes towards us and we will be expected to make a choice. Do we pre-strike Iran’s increasingly advancing nuclear power program before it gets to the point of no return and risk further increasing the war in the middle east that Obama has done a pretty good job of calming down? Do we assist Israel if Iran attacks them and cause a major war to escalate and lead to nuclear war tension like during the Cold War? Do we stay out of the conflict all together and risk Israel and Iran getting out of hand?

We cannot predict the future but what we can be certain of right now is that the rest of the world needs to step up and, for lack of a better term, grow a pair. Terrorism is a difficult enemy, but it’s even more difficult when the U.S. has little to no help. Now is not a time for neutrality and refusing to take a side. Whether we like it or not, war will come, and who then will help the U.S. fight a growing threat?

In the meantime, the U.S. is in dire need of assistance in it’s own way. With a high unemployment rate, a roller-coaster economy, and increasingly partisan views, we need to focus on our own issues. I understand when there’s cause for concern that people around the world are worse off than the average american, but until the situation’s in Iran and Libya get much worse, don’t we owe it to our citizens for everyone to have a job, a home and food? How are we suppose to help someone else when we’re having issues of our own?

So I maintain that the U.S. needs to protect it’s citizens and their liberties until such a time that any serious conflict threatens those aforementioned.

Tax Breaks for Who Now?

In Politics on February 15, 2012 at 6:08 pm

A topic came up recently in our family about tax breaks for the wealthy. I know this topic has not only been on my mind for a while but most of the country so I thought I’d take a crack at tackling the issue.

A major issue is that a lot or most corporations are receiving tax breaks to help encourage capitalism and competition but it actually severely hurts competition. With a lot of companies receiving a bailout in 2008, and then continuing to give CEO’s and executives bonuses, it got a lot of people thinking about what the federal government was doing about regulating these companies.

It led to an argument in our family about whose fault this was, the federal government for not maintaining regulations on the companies or the companies for giving the bailout money to executives. I stood my ground against the federal government for not having the foresight to see that these companies obviously are not morally mature enough to understand what the bailout entailed. It’s like a child spending all of their money and you give them a couple of dollars to help out and hope that they’ll do the right thing with it. You KNOW that child is not responsible with money so how could you trust them? My family blamed the corporations for being frivolous with the bailout money and so we came to an impasse.

I’ve started to develop a system for corporations receiving tax breaks and this is my preliminary draft.

Offer huge tax incentives (tax percentage is based on percentage of production switched from another country to the U.S. So if 40% of your production is done in China and 60% is done in the U.S. a company may change that to now 20% is done in China and 80% is done in the U.S. and that 20% change would be what the tax break would apply to. Therefore, certain incentives only go to companies already doing overseas production and another set of incentives would go to companies that do NOT outsource production. These second set of tax breaks would not apply to companies in the first set and are now asking for incentives to not do it again because they cannot receive the first set of tax breaks again and would not receive the second set ever. Companies in the second set of tax breaks cannot accept the breaks and then outsource production in order to receive the first set of tax breaks for bringing them back.) to companies that do not outsource jobs, in turn, help companies lower the cost of making products so that more American’s will buy American products.

 

Let me know if you find any issues because I’m positive there are plenty of loopholes in here.

Seeing The Good In Every[one]thing

In Family on February 15, 2012 at 4:43 am

I am probably in way over my head starting a blog, but here we are. I just decided to start a blog moments ago after seeing a friend’s that promised it wouldn’t be political and I thought, “Why not?” I adore politics and everything about it. Politics and government are a daily part of our life that some think are worthless or corrupted.

I go through a battle almost every day with my father about what politics are and what it means to be a successful man. He believes that politics are a dirty, disgusting game that no one can play without getting their hands dirty, and that there is no man in this country with a vast amount of wealth who got there without playing the same game. Obviously he looks on the pessimistic side of things and I struggle daily to try to get him to see that not all men are bad. That some people make their way through this world and can do so with moral values.

He has lingering issues with having his fathering skills questioned. Anytime someone says something that could even be skewed to the point that he thinks you’re calling him a “bad father”, he goes into defense mode.

My maternal grandfather, Dean Felton, passed away last Friday and we had the funeral today and I have tried every day to live my life like he did his. He’s powerful and kind and no matter what, family always came first to him. He lived his life seeing the good in everyone person he met, and it has always inspired me to see that too.

Now, this blog won’t be as personal or as emotional as this post was. I’ll do mostly political commentary, public service projects, and just a dash of comedy but I will say from time to time that family will find it’s way in here because Feltons and Fosters know that no matter what you do, family will be right behind you.